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post #335
bio: katie
bio: victoria

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2/24/2006
11:42

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this one is for pony and solstice
Friday, February 24, 2006

› by victoria

Because I liked all of your posts so much today--because they really struck a chord with me--I wanted to write comparing your posts to music. Specifically, the kind of music that builds up into a cathexis, a concentration of emotional energy on an object or idea, the "spontaneous overflow of powerful emotion" that Wordsworth said lived in the soul of a poet.

(*You'll have to pardon my more-than-usual rambling--I've had a really dreadful headache last evening, onto through the night (complete with dreams of being stabbed in the eye) and through this morning, persisting despite a fog of advil and coffee that seems to be doing very little to stop it. I have to hold my head at a strange 30 degree angle to the right because the pain extends down to my neck, and my hands shake while I take notes in class.)

Moving on.

On the album "Catching up to the Future" by Fonda (which I think is probably their best album, ignoring the kinda not-so-good track "I'm Yours"), the amazing pull out all the stops final song "Breathing In" is so incredible that I almost always have to listen to it twice in a row. The way that the tracks are layered makes it almost a shimmering song in the vein of what Coldplay could do if Coldplay really pushed itself out of the rut it's been stuck in, and the vocalist's voice is pulled in so many directions. It's absolutely gorgeous and it is the one must-hear song on the album.

Dreamland Idle Orchestra by Joseph Nothing is another great/musically profound album. Despite its quirky tracks that can sound like old school video game music, it also has songs on it that capture the nostalgia Joseph Nothing felt for his past--he wrote the album based on a themepark where he used to go visit a lot (or live, i'm not sure which) as a child. The final sounds of "Blind Theme for All" fade out like a smile on someone's face.

There's way more good music in that genre, but those albums were the first that came to mind.



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